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FAQ's

Not at all. You can study abroad if you only know English, and you won’t be limited to English-speaking countries like England or Australia, either. While some programs have a language prerequisite or only offer courses in the host country’s language, there are study abroad programs available in English all over the world. If you do end up in a non-English speaking county, you will most likely. If you’re exceptionally worried about the pending language challenges, you can also actively pursue a study abroad program that is taught only in English. Minimize that “lost in translation” feeling!

Studying abroad can be quite affordable and comparable to your regular university tuition. The overall cost will ultimately depend on a variety of factors including: your destination of choice (cost of living), program duration, currency exchange rates, personal expenses, type of exchange, and the fees charged by your program/university.

Federal financial aid can usually be applied towards the study abroad costs. (Note: Always confirm this with your Financial Aid Office.) Don’t forget to apply for scholarships. Ask your university’s international/study abroad office about open scholarships. If you are studying through an independent program, scholarships are usually available for eligible students. You can even look for outside sources; you’ll just have to do some digging!

To decide which country to study abroad in, try considering a number of factors like:

  • the cost of living
  • climate
  • languages spoken
  • job opportunities
  • connectivity to your hometown

The costs associated with studying at a university or school abroad vary greatly. It depends on the nature of your chosen program, the length of your stay, the distance you travel and the kind of lifestyle you want when you get there.
Be aware that some student visas require you to have a certain amount of funds available in your bank account when you arrive in your chosen country. It is best to review the immigration websites for the country you wish to study in or speak to one of our counsellors.
Many students choose to carry out some part-time work alongside their studies to support their living or socialising costs. However, there are restrictions on the hours you are allowed to work to ensure you don’t lose your academic focus. Learn more about the cost of studying abroad here .

We recommend you begin your application process at least a year in advance to give enough time for your applications to be processed and to prepare for your time overseas. Remember, the academic year begins at different times of the year in different countries.

Working while you study can complement your educational and living experience when studying abroad. If you pursue a course at a degree level or above you may be permitted to work while on an international student visa. But before you undertake any paid work, make sure that your visa permits it. The opportunity for students to work part-time during their studies varies from country to country.
Many universities have a dedicated job centre on campus for students that advertises job opportunities and internships to help students develop various skills. The university careers service is also a useful source of information.

The skills and qualifications employers and professional registration bodies require will vary from country to country. If, for example, you are working towards a career with strict entry requirements such as medicine, engineering, accounting or teaching, conduct some research with the relevant registration bodies in India for advice

A better question to ask is, “Why not?” There are SO many great reasons to go abroad. You know the old saying, “Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer”? That’s exactly why you should do it. When you study abroad, you have the opportunity to learn about another culture firsthand, form global friendships, and practice a foreign language. The unique challenges you face will help you grow personally, gain a better understanding of the world, and improve your job prospects after graduation. You’ll return home as a global citizen who is more independent, mature, and tolerant of cultural differences.

Eligibility requirements vary by university and program. The minimum cumulative GPA usually varies between 2.50 to 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, while more competitive programs have a higher GPA requirement. Other qualifications may include a personal statement or letter of recommendation. Consult your home university and/or program provider for specifics, and plan accordingly so you can meet all of the requirements by the time you want to study abroad.

The sooner, the better! When you start early, you’ll have more time to research in depth and find a program that suits your personal and academic needs. You’ll also have more time to decide what type of experience you’re looking for in terms of location, immersion, duration, and cost. It is best to start planning at least one year and no later than one semester before you actually want to depart. Pay attention to application deadlines and apply once you’ve decided on your program (they can fill up quickly!).
If you feel overwhelmed by your options and need help deciding where to go, take a look at the www.studyglobe.com.au. Here you’ll find a quick overview of what it’s like to study abroad in a particular region, as well as reviews of programs from past participants. Once you have chosen a country, you can even read tips on narrowing down your program and read reviews.

To begin studying as an international student, there are a range of entry requirements you may have to meet.
The academic requirements (including evidence of English language skills) you need to study abroad will vary depending on the level of education you want to pursue. For instance, some courses will require you to have done a foundation course before applying for a degree. All universities and schools can have different entry requirements, so read the course information on their respective websites very carefully.
Your IDP counsellor will help you assess your eligibility for different programs and guide you on the courses and locations that best meet your preferences.

We recommend you to start as early as possible. This will give you enough time to ponder upon your interests and research according to your personal and academic goals and aspirations. Location, course duration, costs, accommodation, and living conditions are some of the other aspects that you need to figure out along with your program. Start planning at least one year or intake in advance. Of course, we are here to help you throughout the entire process.
To make it easier to plan, we mapped an indicative timeline for you to get started and live your study abroad dreams.

It’s natural for your family to be nervous about letting their child travel alone to a new country. Millions of students have done so and thrived, but this doesn’t make it less difficult for parents to accept.
We encourage you to involve your parents in any discussions or appointments you have with IDP. With the reassurance of an international education specialist like IDP, your parents would feel more confident seeing you being assisted by a professional and responsible organisation in your applications and preparations.

Your career prospects will benefit hugely from your experience of studying, living and socialising abroad. It’s your opportunity to develop a wealth of new skills, perspectives and stronger English language skills and seek work experience from the kind of employers you’d like to work for.
A recent study conducted with more than 4,500 ex-international students explored the exact skills employers in the US value when it comes to recruiting people that have studied overseas.

While you can apply to study directly to an institution, you may choose to use the expertise of an international education specialist (also known as a student counsellor) to guide you through the process of choosing the right university or college and enrolling thereafter. Using an accredited and trusted agent, like IDP, can help reduce the stress of choosing an institution in another country, applying and preparing to leave.
Our student counsellors are knowledgeable and up-to-date on curriculum changes, and have your best interests at heart. Most of them have been international students themselves and can thus offer first hand advice every step of the way.